Venir De – Recent Past

Venir de – Recent Past

Je viens de visiter un château du XV siècle

The expression ‘VENIR DE + infinitive verb’ expresses the notion of just did something, had just done something. It’s used when two actions happened in sequence, one very close to the other. It’s called the passé récent ou proche – near past, or recent past in English.

  • Although it’s called recent past, ‘VENIR DE’ may be in the présent – present tense. It expresses the idea of ‘just did something’ or ‘just have done something’.
    • Je viens de visiter un château du XV siècle. => I just visited a 15th century castle.
    • Je viens de manger. => I just ate or I have just eaten.

pronoun

je

tu

elle

il

on

nous

vous

ils

elles

present tense

viens de

viens d’

vient de

vient d’

vient de

venons de

venez de

viennent de

viennent de

verb

manger

acheter

parler

aller

boire

voir

vendre

visiter

travailler

English

I just ate

you just bought

she just talked

he/it just went

we just drank

we just saw

you just sold

they just visited

they just worked

.

  • ‘VENIR DE’ can also be conjugated in the imparfait to convey this notion of ‘had just done something’ in the past.
    • Je venais de manger. => I had just eaten.

pronoun

je

tu

elle

il

on

nous

vous

ils

elles

imparfait

venais de

venais d’

venait de

venait d’

venait de

venions de

veniez de

venaient de

venaient de

verb

manger

acheter

parler

aller

boire

voir

vendre

visiter

travailler

English

I had just eaten

you had just bought

she had just talked

he/it had just gone

we had just drunk

we had just seen

you had just sold

they had just visited

they had just worked

.

These are the two most common uses of VENIR DE.

.

In context

  • I just talked.
    • Je viens de parler.
  • We had just laughed.
    • Nous venions de rire.
    • On venait de rire. [more colloquial]

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